Digital Mode Description

Categories: All, Delay Modes, Digital Mode, Feature Descriptions, Post Type
Digital Mode Description

The digital delay model provides a clean digital sound and a flat frequency response with the tone knob in neutral (50%) position. There is a limiter in the feedback path that prevents clipping and keeps the sound clean even when the repeat knob is turned up high. more ...

Analog Mode Description

Categories: All, Analog Mode, Delay Modes, Feature Descriptions, Post Type
Analog Mode Description

The analog delay is based on the solid-state “bucket brigade” delays of the 1970s. When the tone knob is in the 12 o'clock position, you’ll hear the substantial high-frequency roll-off characteristic of these devices. The feedback path includes a saturator that will introduce some distortion when the feedback signal becomes large. When changing the delay time, you’ll notice the delay “slides” to the new value resulting
in a pitch shifted signal while the delay is moving. more ...

Time Pattern Description

Categories: Feature Descriptions, Time Patterns
Time Pattern Description

The TimeBender includes several ready-made delay patterns you can choose with the Pattern knob. They’re described here and in the table that follows, but you may find it easier to sit down and listen to each one while using the TimeBender. Each pattern has one or more “taps” where the delays occur, represented in the pattern symbols by a vertical line. Each tap happens at a certain “chronological distance” from the original note, described in the table below as a percentage of the total pattern’s length of time. Each tap is also panned (left, center, or right), and each tap has a voice assigned to it. more ...

AC001: Memory 1 (Edge Style Delays)

Categories: Audio Clips, Delay Effect Types, Dual Pattern, Factory Presets, Memory 1, Modulation, Rhythmic, Simple Pattern, Tempo Multiplier, Variable Speed Tape
AC001: Memory 1 (Edge Style Delays)

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The first preset uses the third time pattern, which is a dual delay line giving 3/4 of the delay time on the left and the full delay time on the right. Therefore, if you play quarter notes at the delay time shown in the display, then the left side will produce delays in between the notes you play and the right side will produce delays on top of the notes you play. more ...

AC002: Memory 2 (Octave Bounce/Wash)

Categories: Audio Clips, Chorus, Delay Effect Types, Digital Mode, Memory 2, Modulation, Repeats, Rhythmic, Root Based Pattern, Simple Pattern
AC002: Memory 2 (Octave Bounce/Wash)

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The second preset uses an octave down and an octave up shift with the 7th time pattern, which is a root-based delay. Therefore the repeated pattern has the note you play at the displayed delay time followed by an octave down on the left, an octave down on the right, and another octave down on the left. more ...

AC003: Memory 3 (Ominous Tones)

Categories: Ambient, Audio Clips, Delay Effect Types, Dynamic Repeats, Expression Pedal, Factory Presets, Memory 3, Modulation, Multi-Tap Pattern, Repeats, Tone, Voicing
AC003: Memory 3 (Ominous Tones)

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The third preset uses two octaves up for both voicings with the dynamic repeats mode. This produces ominous high pitched tones when playing single notes. Playing chords adds an element of whistling wind to the sound. Use palm muting to control the level of the effect - the more you mute your strings, the louder the effect becomes. more ...

AC004: Memory 4 (Insta-Groove)

Categories: Audio Clips, Envelope, Factory Presets, Memory 4, Rhythmic, Voicing
AC004: Memory 4 (Insta-Groove)

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The fourth preset uses the envelope mode with time pattern 4 and random voicing 4 (rnd4) to create an instant groove on top of what you play. Your guitar signal is sliced up into beats and pitch shifted randomly to one of the following shifts: 2 octaves down, octave down, unison, octave up and 2 octaves up. more ...

Video Compilation

Categories: Delay Modes, Knobs and Buttons, Time Patterns, Video Tutorials
Video Compilation

This is a video compilation of some cool TimeBender effects. This not really a tutorial, but it does show you some of the wide variety of sounds that you can get out of the TimeBender. If you are interested in a specific sound, leave a comment and we will try to get the parameter values posted. more ...

Moving Head Tape Mode Description

Categories: Delay Modes, Feature Descriptions, Moving Head Tape
Moving Head Tape Mode Description

The Moving Head Tape delay is based on early (tube-based) systems that had movable playback tape heads. Like the fixed head tape delay, the Moving Head Tape delay also has saturation in the feedback loop and a characteristic high frequency and low frequency roll-off. There is also a mid-boost sound across the tone range common in tube-based systems. When changing delay time, you’ll hear the sound of a moving tape head rather than the sound of changing the tape speed—the pitch shift amount will depend on the size of the delay change. more ...

Variable Speed Tape Mode Description

Categories: All, Delay Modes, Feature Descriptions, Variable Speed Tape
Variable Speed Tape Mode Description

The Variable Speed Tape delay is based on early tape delays, in which the delay was controlled by changing the speed of the tape. With the Tone knob at 12 o’clock, you’ll hear both high frequency and low frequency roll-off. The feedback path contains a saturator that mimics the saturation characteristics of physical tape. When changing delay time, you’ll hear the pitch of the delayed signal change in exactly the same way as if you had changed the speed of a real tape recorder—the pitch shift amount will depend on the difference between the speed that the delayed signal was recorded at and the new speed. more ...