Digital Mode Description

Categories: All, Delay Modes, Digital Mode, Feature Descriptions, Post Type
Digital Mode Description

The digital delay model provides a clean digital sound and a flat frequency response with the tone knob in neutral (50%) position. There is a limiter in the feedback path that prevents clipping and keeps the sound clean even when the repeat knob is turned up high. more ...

Analog Mode Description

Categories: All, Analog Mode, Delay Modes, Feature Descriptions, Post Type
Analog Mode Description

The analog delay is based on the solid-state “bucket brigade” delays of the 1970s. When the tone knob is in the 12 o'clock position, you’ll hear the substantial high-frequency roll-off characteristic of these devices. The feedback path includes a saturator that will introduce some distortion when the feedback signal becomes large. When changing the delay time, you’ll notice the delay “slides” to the new value resulting
in a pitch shifted signal while the delay is moving. more ...

Time Pattern Description

Categories: Feature Descriptions, Time Patterns
Time Pattern Description

The TimeBender includes several ready-made delay patterns you can choose with the Pattern knob. They’re described here and in the table that follows, but you may find it easier to sit down and listen to each one while using the TimeBender. Each pattern has one or more “taps” where the delays occur, represented in the pattern symbols by a vertical line. Each tap happens at a certain “chronological distance” from the original note, described in the table below as a percentage of the total pattern’s length of time. Each tap is also panned (left, center, or right), and each tap has a voice assigned to it. more ...

Moving Head Tape Mode Description

Categories: Delay Modes, Feature Descriptions, Moving Head Tape
Moving Head Tape Mode Description

The Moving Head Tape delay is based on early (tube-based) systems that had movable playback tape heads. Like the fixed head tape delay, the Moving Head Tape delay also has saturation in the feedback loop and a characteristic high frequency and low frequency roll-off. There is also a mid-boost sound across the tone range common in tube-based systems. When changing delay time, you’ll hear the sound of a moving tape head rather than the sound of changing the tape speed—the pitch shift amount will depend on the size of the delay change. more ...

Variable Speed Tape Mode Description

Categories: All, Delay Modes, Feature Descriptions, Variable Speed Tape
Variable Speed Tape Mode Description

The Variable Speed Tape delay is based on early tape delays, in which the delay was controlled by changing the speed of the tape. With the Tone knob at 12 o’clock, you’ll hear both high frequency and low frequency roll-off. The feedback path contains a saturator that mimics the saturation characteristics of physical tape. When changing delay time, you’ll hear the pitch of the delayed signal change in exactly the same way as if you had changed the speed of a real tape recorder—the pitch shift amount will depend on the difference between the speed that the delayed signal was recorded at and the new speed. more ...

Dynamic Digital Mode Description

Categories: Delay Modes, Dynamic Digital, Feature Descriptions
Dynamic Digital Mode Description

The Dynamic Digital delay type has built-in output “ducking”. Output ducking automatically reduces the level of the delay effect while the input signal is loud. When the input signal decays in volume, the delay effect rises in volume resulting in a very dynamic sound.

Dynamic Analog Mode Description

Categories: Delay Modes, Dynamic Analog, Feature Descriptions
Dynamic Analog Mode Description

The Dynamic Analog delay type includes the same automatic ducking algorithm as Dynamic Digital, but applies this to an analog delay.

Dynamic Repeats Mode Description

Categories: Dynamic Repeats, Feature Descriptions
Dynamic Repeats Mode Description

The Dynamic Repeats delay type is totally new, and combines a Variable Speed Tape delay with a new method of ducking called “feedback ducking”. Perfect for large feedback levels, feedback ucking not only lowers the output level while your playing is loud, but it also reduces the level of the signal going into the feedback loop. This keeps the feedback loop from getting overly saturated while you are playing, and means that the first delay sounds that become audible will be clean.

Time Warp Mode Description

Categories: Feature Descriptions, Time Warp
Time Warp Mode Description

Time Warp is similar to the Analog delay, except that the modulations are synchronized with the delay time and the depth can be much more extreme, varying by hundreds of milliseconds.

Reverse Mode Description

Categories: Delay Modes, Feature Descriptions, Reverse
Reverse Mode Description

The Reverse delay type records the input signal in “chunks” with a length equal to the current delay time setting, and then plays these sound segments back in reverse. Unlike other reverse effects in which the chunks are arbitrary, the TimeBender starts chunks at note onsets where possible in order to avoid having notes cross chunk boundaries. When using Reverse, the Mix knob starts to attenuate (reduce) the dry signal when you turn the knob up, so you can adjust the wet/dry mix. more ...